Restaurant Alma Chooses Dream of Wild Health to Benefit From Giving Back
 Minneapolis, Minn. – For the month of July, Restaurant Alma in Minneapolis has selected non-profit, Dream of Wild Health, to be the local non-profit partner benefiting from their monthly initiative to give back to the community. In January 2014, Restaurant Alma began a monthly initiative to support local community partners and organizations working towards eliminating hunger, increasing food awareness and promoting sustainable agriculture by donating $2 from each tasting menu purchase. Beyond fundraising, Restaurant Alma’s goal is to increase awareness of the missions, work and activities of these important organizations.
Dream of Wild Health is not-for-profit based in an urban Minneapolis office and a ten-acre organic farm in Hugo, Minn. Dream of Wild Health (DWH) works tirelessly on food awareness, eliminating hunger, and reducing food deserts in the Native communities of the Twin Cities. DWH does this through sustainable agriculture on the farm in Hugo, through summer programs with American Indian youth and families, and year round advocacy for food awareness and social justice. The produce grown by DWH is nutritious, organic, pesticide free and no-GMOs. The eggs from the chickens and honey from the bees are also no-GMO and pesticide-free.
www.dreamofwildhealth.org
www.restaurantalma.com

Restaurant Alma Chooses Dream of Wild Health to Benefit From Giving Back

 Minneapolis, Minn. – For the month of July, Restaurant Alma in Minneapolis has selected non-profit, Dream of Wild Health, to be the local non-profit partner benefiting from their monthly initiative to give back to the community. In January 2014, Restaurant Alma began a monthly initiative to support local community partners and organizations working towards eliminating hunger, increasing food awareness and promoting sustainable agriculture by donating $2 from each tasting menu purchase. Beyond fundraising, Restaurant Alma’s goal is to increase awareness of the missions, work and activities of these important organizations.

Dream of Wild Health is not-for-profit based in an urban Minneapolis office and a ten-acre organic farm in Hugo, Minn. Dream of Wild Health (DWH) works tirelessly on food awareness, eliminating hunger, and reducing food deserts in the Native communities of the Twin Cities. DWH does this through sustainable agriculture on the farm in Hugo, through summer programs with American Indian youth and families, and year round advocacy for food awareness and social justice. The produce grown by DWH is nutritious, organic, pesticide free and no-GMOs. The eggs from the chickens and honey from the bees are also no-GMO and pesticide-free.

www.dreamofwildhealth.org

www.restaurantalma.com

lakotapeopleslawproject
lakotapeopleslawproject:

Keep SHARING and become a MEMBER: http://lakota.cc/1kvf8ka
Thank you for helping us achieve another milestone in restoring basic rights and sovereignty to Lakota tribes in South Dakota, and a special thanks to A Positive Tomorrow, the experts who got us there. We are now one step closer to implementing foster care run by #Lakota, for Lakota.As of Wednesday, June 25th, five Lakota tribes - Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Yankton, Oglala and Crow Creek - have submitted Title IV-E Applications for Federal Planning Grants. If approved, these planning grants will be used to develop the expertise, equipment and infrastructure for a Lakota-run foster care system.At this crucial juncture, we need your support to keep up the momentum! Recent press coverage has been essential in taking this groundbreaking accomplishment to a broad, nationwide audience. The Argus Leader, Rapid City Journal, and Indian Country Today Media Network have each reported on this historic event.Now, with the Title IV-E Applications in, the five tribes have only three months to demonstrate their commitment to implementing this project. This means that we will have to work even harder to convince the federal government to prioritize the South Dakota tribes and to fund their applications in early October. This is the first step in transferring federal money from the state to the tribes. Your support of our continued efforts, may it be press coverage, public outreach, research or education, will be vital to our success.Our membership drive invites you to contribute automatic monthly recurring donations. You will receive membership stickers, posters, shirts and a newsletter with all relevant updates. Experience the peace of mind that comes with helping the Lakota tribes provide a solution to the slow cultural genocide they’ve been facing for generations.Thank you again for all of the support you’ve already given to this historic journey, and thanks to the courageous tribal leaders. We are still climbing the mountain, but victory is on the horizon. With the friendship of people like you, we can see a new day coming!Wopila,Madonna Thunder HawkLakota Grandmothers Su Ta Najin Pe

lakotapeopleslawproject:

Keep SHARING and become a MEMBER: http://lakota.cc/1kvf8ka

Thank you for helping us achieve another milestone in restoring basic rights and sovereignty to Lakota tribes in South Dakota, and a special thanks to A Positive Tomorrow, the experts who got us there. We are now one step closer to implementing foster care run by #Lakota, for Lakota.

As of Wednesday, June 25th, five Lakota tribes - Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Yankton, Oglala and Crow Creek - have submitted Title IV-E Applications for Federal Planning Grants. If approved, these planning grants will be used to develop the expertise, equipment and infrastructure for a Lakota-run foster care system.

At this crucial juncture, we need your support to keep up the momentum! Recent press coverage has been essential in taking this groundbreaking accomplishment to a broad, nationwide audience. The Argus Leader, Rapid City Journal, and Indian Country Today Media Network have each reported on this historic event.

Now, with the Title IV-E Applications in, the five tribes have only three months to demonstrate their commitment to implementing this project. This means that we will have to work even harder to convince the federal government to prioritize the South Dakota tribes and to fund their applications in early October. This is the first step in transferring federal money from the state to the tribes. Your support of our continued efforts, may it be press coverage, public outreach, research or education, will be vital to our success.

Our membership drive invites you to contribute automatic monthly recurring donations. You will receive membership stickers, posters, shirts and a newsletter with all relevant updates. Experience the peace of mind that comes with helping the Lakota tribes provide a solution to the slow cultural genocide they’ve been facing for generations.

Thank you again for all of the support you’ve already given to this historic journey, and thanks to the courageous tribal leaders. We are still climbing the mountain, but victory is on the horizon. With the friendship of people like you, we can see a new day coming!

Wopila,

Madonna Thunder Hawk
Lakota Grandmothers Su Ta Najin Pe

Summer kicked off with one week of Cora’s Kids program for ages 8-12. The children learned about the farm, the chickens, the heirloom seeds, culture, food, produce, gardening, and to simply be kids outside in the fresh air eating good vegetables grown with their help. Another session of Cora’s Kids will happen later this summer. 

In the photos (from top to bottoms): taking a break in the apple tree, learning around compost, learning from a master gardener, gathering to talk about foods, vegetables, and a typical lunch plate.

Summer kicked off with one week of Cora’s Kids program for ages 8-12. The children learned about the farm, the chickens, the heirloom seeds, culture, food, produce, gardening, and to simply be kids outside in the fresh air eating good vegetables grown with their help. Another session of Cora’s Kids will happen later this summer. 
In the photos (from biggest to clockwise): a girl with her own traditional tobacco pouch that she made, learning around compost, an average plate of lunch, gathering to talk about foods, vegetables, and what we eat.

Summer kicked off with one week of Cora’s Kids program for ages 8-12. The children learned about the farm, the chickens, the heirloom seeds, culture, food, produce, gardening, and to simply be kids outside in the fresh air eating good vegetables grown with their help. Another session of Cora’s Kids will happen later this summer. 

In the photos (from biggest to clockwise): a girl with her own traditional tobacco pouch that she made, learning around compost, an average plate of lunch, gathering to talk about foods, vegetables, and what we eat.

Meagan Baldy is trying to start a food revolution in Indian country. Like many of her allies, she sees the way forward as going backward.

From her home kitchen, Baldy,director of the Hoopa Community Garden,is hoping to reignite a desire among Native peoples to cook like our ancestors.

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/05/12/video-hoopa-home-chef-meagan-baldy-dices-and-fries-deer-meat-and-veggies-154842