whatisfoodjustice

whatisfoodjustice:

brownroundboi:

original article found here.
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Written by Tanea Lunsford.

Growing up, I can remember taking trips to the corner store much more vividly and frequently than trips to the grocery store. While we had to drive ten to fifteen minutes across the city to get to the closest grocery store, the corner store was always two blocks in any direction. We were seemingly forgotten by the supermarket and grocery stores that were distributed generously in other parts of the city. I remember listening to the complaints and discussions about the lack of different resources and businesses within my neighborhood.

As a child however, I was easily appeased by the presence of sugary drinks and salty, hydrogenated snacks. I had no idea that I was living in the middle of a food desert.

I enjoyed trips with my mother to the grocery store as a kid, she would tell us to pick fruit we wanted. She would compromise with me on a pack of frozen vegetables other than broccoli, for which I had a well-known disgust. While I learned about the importance of eating healthy in school and at home, the resources needed for this were limited in my community. Even today the layout of my community is so that the fast food restaurants and corner stores are more than a 30 to 1 ratio to grocery stores. After some reading about food deserts, I realized that much of the lack of resources is due to redlining. Redlining is a process performed by lenders, companies, and other potential resources to discriminate against and divest funds and services from a neighborhood based on their supposed risks and foreseen inability to yield successful returns when given the support. I started to understand that the businesses of corner stores and fast food restaurants in my community were able to thrive because they have been placed in a community that lacks healthy, affordable alternatives. These unhealthy businesses are able to succeed in our community because they attempt to (and often succeed) replace grocery stores and supermarkets by selling things at these venues (i.e. fruit, meat, paper towels, toilet tissue, vegetables, etc.) at hiked prices and poor quality (in the case of the fruits and vegetables) because of longer shelf-life in an environment that was not designed considering the preservation and maintenance of perishable items.

However, the presence of these unhealthy sources is not a band-aid solution for lack of healthy resources, it is an unfit replacement and hindrance for growing families who have to choose between price and quality—often without healthy produce being an option.

The presence of healthy food in all communities is necessary for everyone to have the opportunity to embrace a healthy lifestyle as a reality and not something that is characterized as only belonging to people who can “afford” it or who live in more affluent communities. The denial of accessible healthy food for some has created a view of healthy resources as a privilege enjoyed by those with grocery stores and supermarkets nearby rather than a right for all to enjoy equally. The denial of grocery stores and healthy food businesses in certain neighborhoods creates a hierarchy of classes, those that are “deserving” or “worthy” of healthy resources and those who are not.

I would like to pose the question to the few companies who make the decision of where healthy foods are made available, “Who IS worthy of eating nutritious healthy foods?” My hope is that actions in the future will point towards a just answer, which is “everyone”.

Tanea Lunsford is a sophomore at Columbia, studying Anthropology and Human Rights. She grew up in the Oceanview and Hunter’s Point/Bayview communities of San Francisco. She worked as a summer intern at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute. Email: tanea.lunsford@gmail.com

For more on food deserts and what you can do to bring fresh food into your community, I suggest picking up Mark Winne’s Closing the Food Gap.

Also, if you live in New York City, the Brooklyn Food Coalition is putting together a map to determine food access in low income and underserved neighborhoods. It’s still got a ways to go before it covers many of the city’s worst food deserts, but it’s a great project that came from the community. I strongly suggest you volunteer if you live in the area.

There are also some resources here that show the overlap between lack of access to supermarkets in NYC and rates of disease, which shows it’s not just about knowledge of healthy food that prevents people from eating fruits and vegetables, or about price (though that is a major issue) but about access. Meanwhile, fast food chains creep in and take advantage of food deserts like it’s their job (and in a climate that allows this to happen, in fact it is.)

Garden Warriors plant, grow, harvest throughout their summer session with Dream of Wild Health - learning ideas, culture, teamwork, leadership, nutrition, and more. They grow and change over four weeks, much like the amazing produce that comes out of their efforts. 

dirtyhippieproductions
dirtyhippieproductions:

Foods we would loose without bee’s pollinating 
Apples
Mangos
Rambutan
Kiwi Fruit
Plums
Peaches
Nectarines
Guava
Rose Hips
Pomegranites
Pears
Black and Red Currants
Alfalfa
Okra
Strawberries
Onions
Cashews
Cactus
Prickly Pear
Apricots
Allspice
Avocados
Passion Fruit
Lima Beans
Kidney Beans
Adzuki Beans
Green Beans
Orchid Plants
Custard Apples
Cherries
Celery
Coffee
Walnut
Cotton
Lychee
Flax
Acerola – used in Vitamin C supplements
Macadamia Nuts
Sunflower Oil
Goa beans
Lemons
Buckwheat
Figs
Fennel
Limes
Quince
Carrots
Persimmons
Palm Oil
Loquat
Durian
Cucumber
Hazelnut
Cantaloupe
Tangelos
Coriander
Caraway
Chestnut
Watermelon
Star Apples
Coconut
Tangerines
Boysenberries
Starfruit
Brazil Nuts
 Beets
Mustard Seed
Rapeseed
Broccoli
Cauliflower
Cabbage
Brussels Sprouts
Bok Choy (Chinese Cabbage)
Turnips
Congo Beans
Sword beans
Chili peppers, red peppers, bell peppers, green peppers
Papaya
Safflower
Sesame
Eggplant
Raspberries
Elderberries
Blackberries
Clover
Tamarind
Cocoa
Black Eyed Peas
Vanilla
Cranberries
Tomatoes
Grapes
If one of your favorites is on this list, you should consider becoming a bee activist.
☮  ❤ ॐ 

dirtyhippieproductions:

Foods we would loose without bee’s pollinating 

  • Apples
  • Mangos
  • Rambutan
  • Kiwi Fruit
  • Plums
  • Peaches
  • Nectarines
  • Guava
  • Rose Hips
  • Pomegranites
  • Pears
  • Black and Red Currants
  • Alfalfa
  • Okra
  • Strawberries
  • Onions
  • Cashews
  • Cactus
  • Prickly Pear
  • Apricots
  • Allspice
  • Avocados
  • Passion Fruit
  • Lima Beans
  • Kidney Beans
  • Adzuki Beans
  • Green Beans
  • Orchid Plants
  • Custard Apples
  • Cherries
  • Celery
  • Coffee
  • Walnut
  • Cotton
  • Lychee
  • Flax
  • Acerola – used in Vitamin C supplements
  • Macadamia Nuts
  • Sunflower Oil
  • Goa beans
  • Lemons
  • Buckwheat
  • Figs
  • Fennel
  • Limes
  • Quince
  • Carrots
  • Persimmons
  • Palm Oil
  • Loquat
  • Durian
  • Cucumber
  • Hazelnut
  • Cantaloupe
  • Tangelos
  • Coriander
  • Caraway
  • Chestnut
  • Watermelon
  • Star Apples
  • Coconut
  • Tangerines
  • Boysenberries
  • Starfruit
  • Brazil Nuts
  •  Beets
  • Mustard Seed
  • Rapeseed
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Bok Choy (Chinese Cabbage)
  • Turnips
  • Congo Beans
  • Sword beans
  • Chili peppers, red peppers, bell peppers, green peppers
  • Papaya
  • Safflower
  • Sesame
  • Eggplant
  • Raspberries
  • Elderberries
  • Blackberries
  • Clover
  • Tamarind
  • Cocoa
  • Black Eyed Peas
  • Vanilla
  • Cranberries
  • Tomatoes
  • Grapes

If one of your favorites is on this list, you should consider becoming a bee activist.

☮  ❤ ॐ 

Watching plants grow, learning respect for other living creatures, and understanding where our food comes from are important components of our summer Garden Warriors programs. Session II is wrapping up this week and our youth are ready to be food advocates for nutrition, health, diabetes prevention, and food justice. 

The outdoor festival on Saturday was a beautiful gathering and a successful event. The people, the park, the food, the music all came together to celebrate the Indigenous culture in Minnesota. We were proud to have our youth program participants giving food demonstrations on how to prepare corn bread, a stewed blue berry sauce, and rice pilaf. We also had birchbark basket making demonstrations. The O’wamni Falling Water Festival was a wonderful day!

Restaurant Alma Chooses Dream of Wild Health to Benefit From Giving Back
 Minneapolis, Minn. – For the month of July, Restaurant Alma in Minneapolis has selected non-profit, Dream of Wild Health, to be the local non-profit partner benefiting from their monthly initiative to give back to the community. In January 2014, Restaurant Alma began a monthly initiative to support local community partners and organizations working towards eliminating hunger, increasing food awareness and promoting sustainable agriculture by donating $2 from each tasting menu purchase. Beyond fundraising, Restaurant Alma’s goal is to increase awareness of the missions, work and activities of these important organizations.
Dream of Wild Health is not-for-profit based in an urban Minneapolis office and a ten-acre organic farm in Hugo, Minn. Dream of Wild Health (DWH) works tirelessly on food awareness, eliminating hunger, and reducing food deserts in the Native communities of the Twin Cities. DWH does this through sustainable agriculture on the farm in Hugo, through summer programs with American Indian youth and families, and year round advocacy for food awareness and social justice. The produce grown by DWH is nutritious, organic, pesticide free and no-GMOs. The eggs from the chickens and honey from the bees are also no-GMO and pesticide-free.
www.dreamofwildhealth.org
www.restaurantalma.com

Restaurant Alma Chooses Dream of Wild Health to Benefit From Giving Back

 Minneapolis, Minn. – For the month of July, Restaurant Alma in Minneapolis has selected non-profit, Dream of Wild Health, to be the local non-profit partner benefiting from their monthly initiative to give back to the community. In January 2014, Restaurant Alma began a monthly initiative to support local community partners and organizations working towards eliminating hunger, increasing food awareness and promoting sustainable agriculture by donating $2 from each tasting menu purchase. Beyond fundraising, Restaurant Alma’s goal is to increase awareness of the missions, work and activities of these important organizations.

Dream of Wild Health is not-for-profit based in an urban Minneapolis office and a ten-acre organic farm in Hugo, Minn. Dream of Wild Health (DWH) works tirelessly on food awareness, eliminating hunger, and reducing food deserts in the Native communities of the Twin Cities. DWH does this through sustainable agriculture on the farm in Hugo, through summer programs with American Indian youth and families, and year round advocacy for food awareness and social justice. The produce grown by DWH is nutritious, organic, pesticide free and no-GMOs. The eggs from the chickens and honey from the bees are also no-GMO and pesticide-free.

www.dreamofwildhealth.org

www.restaurantalma.com

lakotapeopleslawproject
lakotapeopleslawproject:

Keep SHARING and become a MEMBER: http://lakota.cc/1kvf8ka
Thank you for helping us achieve another milestone in restoring basic rights and sovereignty to Lakota tribes in South Dakota, and a special thanks to A Positive Tomorrow, the experts who got us there. We are now one step closer to implementing foster care run by #Lakota, for Lakota.As of Wednesday, June 25th, five Lakota tribes - Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Yankton, Oglala and Crow Creek - have submitted Title IV-E Applications for Federal Planning Grants. If approved, these planning grants will be used to develop the expertise, equipment and infrastructure for a Lakota-run foster care system.At this crucial juncture, we need your support to keep up the momentum! Recent press coverage has been essential in taking this groundbreaking accomplishment to a broad, nationwide audience. The Argus Leader, Rapid City Journal, and Indian Country Today Media Network have each reported on this historic event.Now, with the Title IV-E Applications in, the five tribes have only three months to demonstrate their commitment to implementing this project. This means that we will have to work even harder to convince the federal government to prioritize the South Dakota tribes and to fund their applications in early October. This is the first step in transferring federal money from the state to the tribes. Your support of our continued efforts, may it be press coverage, public outreach, research or education, will be vital to our success.Our membership drive invites you to contribute automatic monthly recurring donations. You will receive membership stickers, posters, shirts and a newsletter with all relevant updates. Experience the peace of mind that comes with helping the Lakota tribes provide a solution to the slow cultural genocide they’ve been facing for generations.Thank you again for all of the support you’ve already given to this historic journey, and thanks to the courageous tribal leaders. We are still climbing the mountain, but victory is on the horizon. With the friendship of people like you, we can see a new day coming!Wopila,Madonna Thunder HawkLakota Grandmothers Su Ta Najin Pe

lakotapeopleslawproject:

Keep SHARING and become a MEMBER: http://lakota.cc/1kvf8ka

Thank you for helping us achieve another milestone in restoring basic rights and sovereignty to Lakota tribes in South Dakota, and a special thanks to A Positive Tomorrow, the experts who got us there. We are now one step closer to implementing foster care run by #Lakota, for Lakota.

As of Wednesday, June 25th, five Lakota tribes - Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Yankton, Oglala and Crow Creek - have submitted Title IV-E Applications for Federal Planning Grants. If approved, these planning grants will be used to develop the expertise, equipment and infrastructure for a Lakota-run foster care system.

At this crucial juncture, we need your support to keep up the momentum! Recent press coverage has been essential in taking this groundbreaking accomplishment to a broad, nationwide audience. The Argus Leader, Rapid City Journal, and Indian Country Today Media Network have each reported on this historic event.

Now, with the Title IV-E Applications in, the five tribes have only three months to demonstrate their commitment to implementing this project. This means that we will have to work even harder to convince the federal government to prioritize the South Dakota tribes and to fund their applications in early October. This is the first step in transferring federal money from the state to the tribes. Your support of our continued efforts, may it be press coverage, public outreach, research or education, will be vital to our success.

Our membership drive invites you to contribute automatic monthly recurring donations. You will receive membership stickers, posters, shirts and a newsletter with all relevant updates. Experience the peace of mind that comes with helping the Lakota tribes provide a solution to the slow cultural genocide they’ve been facing for generations.

Thank you again for all of the support you’ve already given to this historic journey, and thanks to the courageous tribal leaders. We are still climbing the mountain, but victory is on the horizon. With the friendship of people like you, we can see a new day coming!

Wopila,

Madonna Thunder Hawk
Lakota Grandmothers Su Ta Najin Pe